Wednesday, February 3, 2016 at 3:39 PM
Ash Wednesday; February 10, 2016 Masses, 8AM - 4PM and 7PM Ashes will be distributed at each Mass.

Welcome to Saint George Parish Community!

Our Church

"I rejoiced when I heard them say let us go to the house of the Lord." Psalm 122


Welcome to our website! Saint George Parish is a welcoming Catholic community called by God to live out the message of Christ in love and service to all people.

If you are new to the area, just visiting, or looking to learn more about the Catholic faith, we invite you to join us for Mass and one of our many community events. Come and learn more. Or contact us by phone or Email. 

Reverend Leo P. Oswald
Pastor

If you would like to register online, please click on the Newcomers tab for the Registration Form and fill in the information. Once submittted, you will be contacted by a member of our staff to confirm the information and to let you know that it has been processed. 

 

Mission Statement

 

 St. George Parish Bingo

 

Prayers for Those Who Serve

Do you have a loved one who is serving in the military? Parishioners are invited to provide a 5x7 photograph for the altar of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The photograph of your loved one will allow others to see the face of the person who is serving on their behalf as we pray for their well-being and safe return. Please contact the Rectory Office for more details. 


Memorials

Saint George Parish is pleased to offer the Tree of Life to parishioners and friends who would like to have their loved ones name engraved and permanately placed upon its branches. This tree is a special way to remember a loved one. You choose what is written on the leaf or boulder and a professional engraving is done and then added to the tree for all to see as they enter the church. Please contact the Rectory Office for more details. 

Memorial candles burn at the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Jospeh altars in the church for your intentions. Candles are available for two full days for a stipened of $2. Candles are also available for an entire year for $200 and can be purchased by contacting the Rectory Office. If you choose an annual memorial candle, your loved one's name will be placed at the base of the candle where it will remain for one year's time. 

Mass intentions can be scheduled at the Rectory Office. A Mass can be celebrated for the intentions of your living or deceased loved ones for a $10 stipend. You will receive a beautiful Mass card, which can be presented to the family of a deceased relative or friend. The sacred Scriptures tell us that "to remember the deceased is a holy and pious thought and the person who does this acts in an excellent and noble way."

If you would like to schedule a Mass for your loved one, please stop by the Rectory Office during business hours. 

     
 
                         

 

Please check out our January 2016 Youth Group Newsletter for exciting and fun events. We have much planned during January and we hope you can join us for Family Bingo and our Play tryouts.

 

Click here for our January 2016 Youth Group Newsletter

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Pope Francis Proclaims "Year of Mercy."

December 8, 2015 to November 20, 2016

The Extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy is a remarkable occasion during which the entire Catholic Church, under the humble leadership of Pope Francis, opens wide the doors to the saving mercy of Christ. The Year of Mercy is celebrated from December 8th, 2015 - the Feast of the Immaculate Conception and the 50th anniversary of the closing of Vatican II - to the Solemnity of Christ the King on November 20, 2016.

During this special period of time in the Church, Pope Francis calls all Catholics to be profound witnesses to mercy and to "find the joy rediscovering and rendering fruitful God's mercy, with which we are all called to give comfort to every man and every woman of our time." To learn more, please visit the Vatican’s official Year of Mercy website at www.im.va or the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops website at www.usccb.org.         

We are especially encouraged to practice the Spiritual and Corporal Works of Mercy, to receive the Sacrament of Penance as often as needed, and to pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy. Please plan to spend some quiet time throughout this Year of Mercy with the Blessed Sacrament on Fridays, any time between the hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, and on Thursday evenings at 7:00 PM for the recitation of the Most Holy Rosary and the Divine Mercy Chaplet in St. George Chapel.

Lord Jesus Christ, you have taught us to be merciful like the heavenly Father, and have told us that whoever sees you sees Him. Show us Your face and we will be saved. Your loving gaze freed Zacchaeus and Matthew from being enslaved by money; the adulteress and Magdalene from seeking happiness only in created things; made Peter weep after his betrayal, and assured Paradise to the repentant thief. Let us hear, as if addressed to each one of us, the words that You spoke to the Samaritan woman:“If you knew the gift of God!” You are the visible face of the invisible Father, of the God who manifests His power above all by forgiveness and mercy:let the Church be Your visible face in the world, its Lord risen and glorified. You willed that your ministers would also be clothed in weakness in order that they may feel compassion for those in ignorance and error:let everyone who approaches them feel sought after, loved, and forgiven by God. Send Your Spirit and consecrate every one of us with its anointing, so that the Jubilee of Mercy may be a year of grace from the Lord, and your Church, with renewed enthusiasm, may bring good news to the poor, proclaim liberty to captives and the oppressed, and restore sight to the blind. We ask this through the intercession of Mary, Mother of Mercy, You who live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever. Amen.

 

 

 

This weekend's winter storm will be a hardship for many in our area. No one can dispense from the divine law, and in this case, the Third Commandment to keep the Lord's Day. In the face of the impending storm however, Catholics of all ages but especailly the elderly, are advised to use extrmeme caution when making the decision about attending Mass. An indiviual is free to make a prudent decision to remain at home and not venture outside this Sunday, especailly for their safety and the safety of others. Pastors throughout the Archdiocese will maintain as much as possible their regular Sunday Mass schedule for those who are able to attend Mass. When an individual cannot attend Mass, they are encouraged to view the Mass on television, if possible. Also, reading the Word of God especailly bibilical readings for Sunday, praying the Rosary, and/or making use of other devotional prayers can be used to take place in the home as a fitting way to celebrate the Lord's Day.

Special January 2016 Event - Family Bingo  Click Here

Our Mass Schedule

Saturday: 4:30 PM
Sunday: 8:00 AM and 10:00 AM
Weekdays: Mon-Wed-Fri 4:00 PM, Tues-Thurs-Sat. 8:00 AM
Confession: 3:30-4:15 PM Every Saturday at St. George Church and Mondays during Lent and Advent following the 4:00 PM Mass. Also by appointment.

             Our Rectory Hours

Monday thru Friday: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM-3:00 PM
Sunday: 8:30 AM-12:30 AM

Casserole Weekend

Empty casserole pans and suggested casserole recipes are placed at the main (front) doors of the church on the last weekend of every month. Filled, frozen casseroles are then returned on Casserole Weekend, which falls on the first weekend of each month unless otherwise announced.  Casseroles can be returned directly to the Rectory Office on Saturday between the hours of 9:00 AM and 3:00 PM, and on Sunday between 8:30 AM and 12:30 PM. Casseroles can also be dropped off Monday thru Friday between the hours of 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM. All Casseroles are picked up by and delivered to St. John's Hospice in Philadelphia where meals are provided for the homeless. Please join us in our efforts to end hunger. God bless you for reaching out to those in need of a meal.

Ask George

Question: Why do we address priests as “Father” when it clearly states in Matthew 23:9, “Call no one on earth your Father; you have but one Father in heaven.”
Answer: Perhaps the most pointed New Testament reference to the theology of the spiritual fatherhood of priests is Paul’s statement, "I do not write this to make you ashamed, but to admonish you as my beloved children. For though you have countless guides in Christ, you do not have many fathers. For I became your father in Christ Jesus through the gospel" (1 Cor. 4:14–15). 
Peter followed the same custom, referring to Mark as his son: "She who is at Babylon, who is likewise chosen, sends you greetings; and so does my son Mark" (1 Pet. 5:13). The apostles sometimes referred to entire churches under their care as their children. Paul writes, "Here for the third time I am ready to come to you. And I will not be a burden, for I seek not what is yours but you; for children ought not to lay up for their parents, but parents for their children" (2 Cor. 12:14); and, "My little children, with whom I am again in travail until Christ be formed in you!" (Gal. 4:19). 
John said, "My little children, I am writing this to you so that you may not sin; but if any one does sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous" (1 John 2:1); "No greater joy can I have than this, to hear that my children follow the truth" (3 John 4). In fact, John also addresses men in his congregations as "fathers" (1 John 2:13–14). 
By referring to these people as their spiritual sons and spiritual children, Peter, Paul, and John imply their own roles as spiritual fathers. Since the Bible frequently speaks of this spiritual fatherhood, we Catholics acknowledge it and follow the custom of the apostles by calling priests "father." Failure to acknowledge this is a failure to recognize and honor a great gift God has bestowed on the Church: the spiritual fatherhood of the priesthood. Catholics know that as members of a parish, they have been committed to a priest’s spiritual care, thus they have great filial affection for priests and call them "father." Priests, in turn, follow the apostles’ biblical example by referring to members of their flock as "my son" or "my child" (cf. Gal. 4:19; 1 Tim. 1:18; 2 Tim. 2:1; Philem. 10; 1 Pet. 5:13; 1 John 2:1; 3 John 4). 
All of these passages were written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, and they express the infallibly recorded truth that Christ’s ministers do have a role as spiritual fathers.
Jesus is not against acknowledging that. It is He who gave these men their role as spiritual fathers, and it is His Holy Spirit who recorded this role for us in the pages of Scripture.
It is also interesting to know that the Pope, in Italian, is referred to as Papa. Jesus refers to His father as Abba, also an intimate term for God as Father. In simple terms, the role of a priest is to be a shepherd/father to his flock, who are the “family” of the Church.
We received another interesting question regarding the Our Father prayer, which we will address in another Bulletin issue. Thank you for your questions. We are happy to address your concerns.